Functional facts about hip muscles

This blog is a compilation of fun and functional facts about the muscles which control and move the hip. Presented here are concepts around anatomy, muscle synergies and changes to muscle function which occur with pathology, specifically OA. There is also a review of the current knowledge and details that drive our decision making around exercise prescription for retraining hip strength, particularly hip extension, abduction and external rotation strength. 

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Pregnancy related DRAM

DRAM/DRA is the acronym for diastisis of the rectus abdominus muscle, which is a separation between the left and right halves of the rectus abdominus through widening for the central ligament known as the linea alba (LA). It has been shown to be present in 27%-100% of women during the second and third trimester of pregnancy and up to 68% of women in the post-partum period (Hilde, Tennfjord, Sperstad & Engh., 2017). This blog explores the current research around assessment, diagnosis and exercise prescription for rehabilitation.

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Gluteal tendinopathy

As the term lateral hip pain has evolved from greater trochanteric pain syndrome and trochanteric bursitis, to gluteal tendinopathy, we too have seen a growing amount of clinic trials published sharing what is known about this condition and evaluating the effectiveness of our current treatment methods. 

I was thrilled to see a paper recently released in the BMJ by a powerhouse group of researchers on the effectiveness of three different treatment approaches for this condition. Mellor, Bennell, Grimaldi et al (2018) conducted the first RCT to evaluate the effect of: education about tendon loading & exercises specific to stage of tendon pathology, versus a single CSI, versus a wait and see approach, on pain and functional outcomes with gluteal tendinopathy.

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Surgical vs non-surgical treatment for the knee

Presented in this blog are the key messages from CPG over the past 10 years regarding the assessment and treatment (both surgical and non surgical) for meniscal lesions, degenerative knee disease, articular cartilage lesions, and ACL tears. 

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