Calving it up

The first aim for this blog was to highlight how we can break down the components of a dynamic balance test such as the SEBT, or understand the requirements for normal gait and stair navigation. The second is to emphasise the importance of making sure that our early stages of rehabilitation allow for sufficient time to help our patients develop the range of movement, muscle length and neuromuscular control to allow them to be successful when integrating these components together. I recognise that these exercises aren't radically new or fancy, heck they can be just down right boring, but when done right and combined with the education as to why, they can be hugely impactful

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The Tetris effect

This case presentation describes two areas of treating elbows that look beyond traditionally used exercises and manual therapy. The first is the freedom of combined active movements and the second is what I call the Tetris effect. Both of these components were pivotal in this patient's recovery from acute lateral epicondylalgia.

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Hip: Athletic Groin Pain Part 1

This week we continue to look at the hip by exploring the definition of athletic groin pain (AGP). This blog series dissects three research papers from Dublin about the clinical assessment, role of MRI and biomechanical changes with AGP. First up - what is the groin triangle and what does groin pain mean?

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Hip: Ligamentum Teres

This week we discuss another hot hip topic in the sporting world - ligamentum teres and it's role in hip pain. Alicia discusses the clinical anatomy of ligamentum teres, evidence supporting it's structure and function and the role it plays in hip pain. 

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Cervical Motor Control Part 4 - Rehabilitation Principles

The forth and final blog covers the rehabilitation principles for retraining cervical motor control. Aside from discussing the initial two phases of rehab (activation patterns & coordination) we also compare the final stages of training for an office working, painter and athlete based on their functional requirements. 

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